why the industrial revolution happened in britain

The Industrial Revolution began in Britain for a number of different reasons. See Image One Britain had access to a number of natural resources, such as iron and coal. The agricultural sector of the British economy had been steadily growing during the 18th century. Agricultural stability allowed the British population to increase. Population growth created a number of new opportunities. There were new markets for products. There was a larger labour market. Economic stability allowed British businessmen to take risks and invest in new enterprises, encourage investments and discover new overseas markets. Britain, being an island, was removed from the wars in continental Europe. Due to stability, peace and prosperity at home, the British were able to acquire a number of colonies overseas. Colonies in America and Asia established new import and export markets. Peace and prosperity in Britain also encouraged freedom of thought. British scientists were able to dedicate their time and energy to developing new and efficient technologies. There was no one, single reason that the Industrial Revolution occurred in Britain. The Industrial Revolution was a result of a number of processes that had been building up over a long period of time. Britain is an island rich in natural resources. Three key natural resources for the Industrial Revolution were iron, coal and waterways. Iron was the main material used in industrial machinery. The Industrial Revolution grew from innovations made in iron-making techniques. Coal was another important natural resource. Coal was used to power steam engines. Improvements in steam-engine technology resulted in a more effective usage of coal. See Image Two Britain was home to large deposits of iron and coal. These two minerals were the key to the Industrial Revolution. Since iron and coal did not have to be imported, the British economy did not suffer any shortages and the Industrial Revolution gained momentum. There are a number of rivers in Britain. In the years leading to the Industrial Revolution, water was used as a source of power and as a mode of transportation. Water provided energy to power mills (such as watermills), precursors to steam engines and machines. Britain's waterways also played an important role in the transportation of goods when canals were constructed. See Image Three Britain's economy was based on agriculture. In the 18th century, agricultural production was on the rise. Greater agricultural productivity meant more food for the British people. With increased food, health improved. This led to an increase in the size of the British population and, consequently, the labour force.


British workers began to save money. This increased their capital, money which could be invested later. People began to experiment with improving farming techniques and other new technologies to increase profit. Britain's economic stability, brought about by natural resources, agricultural production and increased wealth, allowed British businessmen the opportunity to invest in the development of innovations. Increased investment led to a surge in development. The opportunities provided by Britain's natural resources and increasing prosperity were also encouraged by political stability. See Image Four As an island, Britain was isolated from the wars of continental Europe. Britain had endured a civil war and revolution in the 17th century. By the late 18th century, monarchic control over Britain had weakened and there was peace. Opportunities for social mobility emerged. By the time of the Industrial Revolution, it was possible for people to rise from poverty to riches. A middle class of businessmen invested their money in new technologies and engineering projects. See Image Five Peace and prosperity in Britain led to the acquisition of a number of overseas colonies, particularly in Asia and America. As Britain's overseas colonies grew in number, new import and export markets emerged. These new opportunities for profit were exploited by British businessmen. See Image Six The Industrial Revolution was stimulated by a number of inventions and developments by British scientists. These inventions were encouraged by freedom of thought. Britain was receptive to intellectual developments from Europe. British thought was secular, rational and focused on science and development. This freedom of thought allowed British scientists to develop new technologies. In the 18th century, Britain was a land of opportunity. A number of processes worked in favour of the Industrial Revolution. Britain had access to a large number of natural resources, access that increased with the acquisition of overseas colonies. Political stability and freedom of thought allowed a number of inventors to develop new technology. Wealthy businessmen invested in these technologies. New technologies started a chain reaction in Britain that became known as the Industrial Revolution. Demands for products led to the development of efficient transportation systems. This included the building of a number of canals, roads and finally, railways. By the early 19th century, Britain was producing over three-quarters of the mined coal, half the cotton and iron goods and the majority of steam engines in continental Europe.
The Industrial Revolution began in Britain for a number of different reasons.


See Image One Britain had access to a number of natural resources, such as iron and coal. The agricultural sector of the British economy had been steadily growing during the 18th century. Agricultural stability allowed the British population to increase. Population growth created a number of new opportunities. There were new markets for products. There was a larger labour market. Economic stability allowed British businessmen to take risks and invest in new enterprises, encourage investments and discover new overseas markets. Britain, being an island, was removed from the wars in continental Europe. Due to stability, peace and prosperity at home, the British were able to acquire a number of colonies overseas. Colonies in America and Asia established new import and export markets. Peace and prosperity in Britain also encouraged freedom of thought. British scientists were able to dedicate their time and energy to developing new and efficient technologies. There was no one, single reason that the Industrial Revolution occurred in Britain. The Industrial Revolution was a result of a number of processes that had been building up over a long period of time. Britain is an island rich in natural resources. Three key natural resources for the Industrial Revolution were iron, coal and waterways. Iron was the main material used in industrial machinery. The Industrial Revolution grew from innovations made in iron-making techniques. Coal was another important natural resource. Coal was used to power steam engines. Improvements in steam-engine technology resulted in a more effective usage of coal. See Image Two Britain was home to large deposits of iron and coal. These two minerals were the key to the Industrial Revolution. Since iron and coal did not have to be imported, the British economy did not suffer any shortages and the Industrial Revolution gained momentum. There are a number of rivers in Britain. In the years leading to the Industrial Revolution, water was used as a source of power and as a mode of transportation. Water provided energy to power mills (such as watermills), precursors to steam engines and machines. Britain's waterways also played an important role in the transportation of goods when canals were constructed. See Image Three Britain's economy was based on agriculture. In the 18th century, agricultural production was on the rise. Greater agricultural productivity meant more food for the British people. With increased food, health improved. This led to an increase in the size of the British population and, consequently, the labour force.


British workers began to save money. This increased their capital, money which could be invested later. People began to experiment with improving farming techniques and other new technologies to increase profit. Britain's economic stability, brought about by natural resources, agricultural production and increased wealth, allowed British businessmen the opportunity to invest in the development of innovations. Increased investment led to a surge in development. The opportunities provided by Britain's natural resources and increasing prosperity were also encouraged by political stability. See Image Four As an island, Britain was isolated from the wars of continental Europe. Britain had endured a civil war and revolution in the 17th century. By the late 18th century, monarchic control over Britain had weakened and there was peace. Opportunities for social mobility emerged. By the time of the Industrial Revolution, it was possible for people to rise from poverty to riches. A middle class of businessmen invested their money in new technologies and engineering projects. See Image Five Peace and prosperity in Britain led to the acquisition of a number of overseas colonies, particularly in Asia and America. As Britain's overseas colonies grew in number, new import and export markets emerged. These new opportunities for profit were exploited by British businessmen. See Image Six The Industrial Revolution was stimulated by a number of inventions and developments by British scientists. These inventions were encouraged by freedom of thought. Britain was receptive to intellectual developments from Europe. British thought was secular, rational and focused on science and development. This freedom of thought allowed British scientists to develop new technologies. In the 18th century, Britain was a land of opportunity. A number of processes worked in favour of the Industrial Revolution. Britain had access to a large number of natural resources, access that increased with the acquisition of overseas colonies. Political stability and freedom of thought allowed a number of inventors to develop new technology. Wealthy businessmen invested in these technologies. New technologies started a chain reaction in Britain that became known as the Industrial Revolution. Demands for products led to the development of efficient transportation systems. This included the building of a number of canals, roads and finally, railways. By the early 19th century, Britain was producing over three-quarters of the mined coal, half the cotton and iron goods and the majority of steam engines in continental Europe.

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