why do newborns spit up after breastfeeding

You've just fed your baby breast milk or formula only to watch him or her spit up what seems like all of it. Is this normal? Find out the possible causes of spitting up, and what you can do about it. What causes spitting up? Spitting up is common in healthy babies. About half of all babies during their first three months experience their stomach contents coming back up into the esophagus, a condition known as gastroesophageal reflux, infant reflux or infant acid reflux.


Normally, a muscle (lower esophageal sphincter) between the esophagus and the stomach keeps stomach contents where they belong. Until this muscle has time to mature, spitting up might be an issue especially if your baby is relatively full. What is the difference between spitting up and vomiting? Spitting up is the easy flow of a baby's stomach contents through his or her mouth, possibly with a burp. Vomiting occurs when the flow is forceful shooting out inches rather than dribbling from the mouth.


It seems like my baby is spitting up a lot. Can spitting up affect my baby's growth? Normal spitting up doesn't interfere with a baby's well-being. As long as your baby seems comfortable and is eating well and gaining weight, there's little cause for concern. If your baby is gaining weight, then he or she isn't being harmed by the calories lost through spitting up. Keep in mind that it's easy to overestimate the amount your baby has spit up based on the size of a spit-up stain.


Dec. 07, 2015
Spitting up, sometimes called physiological or uncomplicated reflux, is common in babies and is usually (but not always) normal. Most young babies spit up sometimes, since their digestive systems are immature, making it easier for the stomach contents to flow back up into the esophagus (the tube connecting mouth to stomach). Babies often spit up when they get too much milk too fast. This may happen when baby feeds very quickly or aggressively, or when momвs breasts are overfull.


The amount of spitup typically appears to be much more than it really is. If baby is very distractible (pulling off the breast to look around) or fussy at the breast, he may swallow air and spit up more often. Some babies spit up more when they are teething, starting to crawl, or starting solid foods. A few statistics (for all babies, not just breastfed babies): Spitting up usually occurs right after baby eats, but it may also occur 1-2 hours after a feeding.


Half of all 0-3 month old babies spit up at least once per day. Spitting up usually peaks at 2-4 months. Many babies outgrow spitting up by 7-8 months. Most babies have stopped spitting up by 12 months. If your baby is a вHappy Spitterв --gaining weight well, spitting up without discomfort and content most of the time -- spitting up is a laundry social problem rather than a medical issue.