why do people want guantanamo bay closed

Why does Obama want to close Guantanamo? Obama believes that the terrorist detention camp in Cuba is a drain on military resources and "undermines" America's national security. In a speech this week, he argued that terrorists use Guantanamo as propaganda in order to recruit more fighters to their twisted cause. "Keeping this facility open in contrary to our values," Obama said. "It undermines our standing in the world. It is viewed as a stain on our broader record of upholding the higher standards of the law. "
Obama promised to close the camp after he took office in 2009, but he has failed to fulfil his goal in the face of opposition from Congress.


Britain's Alcatraz: Government wants single high-security prison. What will happen if Guantanamo closes? Obama wants to move the remaining fewer than 100 inmates to US maximum security prisons. It is estimated that the closure would save up to $180 million in operating costs every year. "Part of my message to the American people here is we're already holding a bunch of very dangerous terrorists here in the United States," he said this week. "We threw the book at them and there have been no incidents.


We managed it just fine. " Why does Congress oppose closing Guantanamo? Most members of Congress are expected to block the planned closure because they oppose terror suspects being detained on US soil. Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, who is a Republican, said Congress refused to "jeopardise" America's national security for one of Obama's election campaign promises. "After seven years, President Obama has yet to convince the American people that moving Guantanamo terrorists to our homeland is smart or safe," he said.


But House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who is a Democrat, said: I applaud the president for his continued determination to close this dark chapter of our history. " How big is the base in Guantanamo Bay? The naval base in Cuba has held 780 prisoners since it opened in 2002, but there were only 93 prisoners left by mid-January 2016.


The prison camp has become "emblematic of the gross human rights abuses" by the US government, according to Amnesty International. Human rights groups have condemned the base for using harsh interrogation tactics and holding many detainees without charge or trial. Former president George W Bush opened Guantanamo to detain terrorist suspects in the wake of the 9/11 attacks in New York. Five detainees at Guantanamo Bay were transferred to Qatar in exchange for the release of Army Sgt.


Bowe Bergdahl, who was being held by the Taliban. Two senior administration officials confirmed the names of the released detainees, whose photos were obtained by WikiLeaks. Khair Ulla Said Wali Khairkhwa, seen here, was an early member of the Taliban in 1994 and was interior minister during the Taliban's rule. He was arrested in Pakistan and was transferred to Guantanamo in May 2002. During questioning, Khairkhwa denied all knowledge of extremist activities.