why do we have ham for easter

QUESTION: What is the origin of Easter ham? ANSWER: The Easter ham, and most other "Easter" traditions actually have their roots in Paganism and have nothing to do with Christian commemorations of the Resurrection of Jesus. Although Christianity observes Easter to acknowledge the Resurrection, most know it is not the actual day of this event. Still, Paganistic rituals infiltrated the Christian Church and have become intermingled to the point of misconceptions. The word Easter is in the Bible only once and is used Acts chapter 12. There it tells that King Herod (an evil pagan) was preparing to participate in Easter rituals at the time of Peter's arrest.


So Herod delayed bringing Peter forth for sentencing until the pagan rituals were over. (You can read this miraculous story in verses 1-19)
What were these rituals and where did they begin? Noah's grandson (Cush) and his wife Semiramis had a son named Nimrod. Reports say that after Cush's death, Nimrod married his own mother and became a mighty king. He too was eventually killed. His mother then began the deceit of deifying her son/husband, claiming he had become a "sun-god" (the origin of "Easter Sunrise services), and he was then to be called Baal. (Baal was worshipped as a god of fertility and promoted sexual sin. ) She proclaimed that the people of Babylon should worship him and that he was with them in the form of a flame.


This wicked Queen, doing the work of Satan, was creating a new religion and set herself up as the goddess called "Ishtar. " Hence the root of the pronunciation "Easter. " After she became pregnant, she bore a son named Tammuz claiming he was the product of a sunray, which caused her to conceive. But Tammuz grew to be a hunter and was later killed by a wild pig. "Ishtar" then designated a forty day period (the source of Lent) to mark the anniversary of Tammuz's death.


During this time, no meat was to be eaten. Every year, on the first Sunday after the first full moon after the spring equinox, a celebration was made. Ishtar also proclaimed that because a pig killed Tammuz, that a pig must be eaten on that Sunday. This is of course a condensed version of all pagan beliefs originating Easter. Satan is a master deceiver, and has filled the world with idolatries, lies, and misconceptions. The Easter Ham and all else promoting the ancient pagan religion of Mystery Babylon (per "Ishtar") are customs of the false god, Baal. So Why Do We Eat Ham For Easter? by April 1, 2015 7:02 AM Here in South Dakota we love our pork.


Bacon, ham, chops, bacon, bacon, bacon в we love it. Here in the Midwest there are lots of church going folk, me included. Ever since I can remember we have always eaten ham on Easter Sunday. В But why ham? Easter is the celebration of Jesusв resurrection and manвs triumph over sin and death. Jesus was a Jew. And according to the bible Jews were forbidden to eat pork. Deuteronomy, Chapter 14:8-10: В And the pig, because it has a split hoof, but does not chew the cud; it is unclean for you. You shall neither eat of their flesh nor touch their carcass. So how come we load up on pork on Easter Sunday?


It appears like everything else we Americaвs do we adapt to what is most convenient at the time. According toВ If Jesus ate meat at the Last Supper, it would have been lamb. Jewish Passover traditions call for lamb, and so do most European traditions. But in northern Europe pigs were always important. Hams, from pigs slaughtered in the winter, then salted and smoked were ready to eat in the spring before fresh meats were available. This is especially true in North America where lamb was never an important meat. So to sum up the question as to вWhy do we eat ham for Easter? в В Cuz we can.