why do some adults walk on their toes

I like to toewalk from now and then. If you go for causes: Simply because its the natural way to walk. Only because of shoes people got used to hitting the floor with the heel first and rolling over your foot until you finish the step with the toe section. When people didnt have shoes, a normal step begins with the toepart touching the floor, and the heel following. If you run without shoes and would first touch the floor with your heel at every step, your ankles would get ill sooner or later.


So the normal way to walk with the toepart first touching the floor, gives the heel shelter because your body weight is shared upon heel and toepart. (Attention: Most peoples toepart nowadays have to less muscles to carry the bodyweight, so dont try to run like this, if you arent used to walking barefeet. ) While if you touch with the heel first, it has to carry your complete body weight. People that are used to run barefeet on grass or sand normally change their walking style automatically to the way it is normal when going barefeet.


For me personally, I think I dont like the rollpart upon the middle section of the foot, which is so extreme sensitive, and avoid doing so by walking the normal way. With loosen sneakers its also very easy to do so in a way that doesnt draw much attention on you, so if you are not really balancing upon your toes, people shouldnt be able to realize it, until the really concentrate on it.


So because of my sneakers not being very tight my heel normally doesnt touch the floor, because of me stepping a few cm out of them with the heels. So the shoe touches the floor fully, while my heel is a few cm upon it, but still inside the upper part of the shoe. (Sorry, my english not that great, hope you understand what I mean. )
Oetgen ME, et al. Idiopathic toe walking. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. 2012;20:292. Engstrom P, et al. The prevalence and course of idiopathic toe-walking in 5-year-old children.


Pediatrics. 2012;130:279. Williams CM, et al. The toe walking tool: A novel method for assessing idiopathic toe walking children. Gait Posture. 2010;32:508. Cerebral palsy: Hope through research. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www. ninds. nih. gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/detail_cerebral_palsy. htm. Accessed March 2, 2015. Muscular dystrophy: Hope through research. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www. ninds. nih. gov/disorders/md/detail_md. htm.


Accessed March 2, 2015. Autism fact sheet. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www. ninds. nih. gov/disorders/autism/detail_autism. htm. Accessed March 2, 2015. Neurological diagnostic tests and procedures. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www. ninds. nih. gov/disorders/misc/diagnostic_tests. htm. Accessed March 2, 2015.