why do my nails have a yellow tint

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(1)PPP John Howard / Digital Vision / Getty Images (2)PPP Fitzpatricks Color Atlas Synopsis of Clinical Dermatology ; Klaus Wolff, Richard Allen Johnson, Dick Suurmond; Copyright 2005, 2001, 1997, 1993 by The McGraw-Hill Companies. All Rights reserved. (5)PPP Copyright Y ISM / Phototake -- All rights reserved. (6)PPP Copyright Y Pulse Picture Library/CMP Images / Phototake -- All rights reserved. (8)PPP Fitzpatricks Color Atlas Synopsis of Clinical Dermatology ; Klaus Wolff, Richard Allen Johnson, Dick Suurmond; Copyright 2005, 2001, 1997, 1993 by The McGraw-Hill Companies.


All Rights reserved. (9)PPP Fitzpatricks Color Atlas Synopsis of Clinical Dermatology ; Klaus Wolff, Richard Allen Johnson, Dick Suurmond; Copyright 2005, 2001, 1997, 1993 by The McGraw-Hill Companies. All Rights reserved. REFERENCES: American Academy of Dermatology. American Family Physician. Christine Laine, MD, MPH, senior deputy editor, Annals of Internal Medicine ; spokesman, American College of Physicians.


Joshua Fox, MD, director, Advanced Dermatology; spokesman, American Academy of Dermatology. Mount Sinai Medical Center. National Skin Centre. Tamara Lior, MD, dermatologist, Cleveland Clinic Florida. Medical Author: Nail discoloration, in which the nails appear white, yellow, or green, can result from different infections and conditions of the skin. In about 50% of cases, discolored nails are a result of infections with common fungi that can be found in the air, dust, and soil.


There are many species of fungi that can affect nails. By far the most common, however, is called Trichophyton rubrum. This type of fungus has a tendency to infect the skin and is therefore known as a dermatophyte. Pseudomonas is a type of bacteria that infects the nail bed and results in a greenish color to the nails. Red or black (that may sometimes appear bruised) nails may result from a (a collection of blood) under the nail as a result of (including ingrown toenails).


Chronic medical conditions also can affect the appearance of the nails. Specific color changes in the nails can be suggestive of or of, kidney, heart, or lung conditions. This is why doctors pay specific attention to nails during a routine physical examination. Other, rare causes of discolored nails include the "yellow nail syndrome," an inherited condition that results in slow-growing, yellowing, discolored nails and is associated with (swelling of tissues due to the accumulation of fluid) and lung diseases.


Nails may also appear lightened to a whitish-yellow color if there has been separation of the nail from the nail bed, termed. The skin, mucous membranes, and nails may appear blue when there is inadequate oxygenation of blood (cyanosis), but this is not true discoloration of the nail itself. Longo, D. L. , et al. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 18th ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Professional, 2011. Pictures, Images, Illustrations Quizzes