why do we have easter eggs for easter

What is Easter about? Easter is a Christian festival which celebrates the resurrection of Jesus Christ. The Bible says Christ died on the cross on Good Friday and came back to life three days later. Easter is on different dates each year, between 21 March and 25 April, depending on when there's a full moon in spring. There are some unusual modern traditions associated with it. Why do we have Easter eggs? A lot of us may chomp on chocolate eggs at Easter, but originally eating eggs was not allowed by the church during the week leading up to Easter (known as Holy Week). So any eggs laid that week were saved and decorated to make them 'Holy Week eggs', then given to children as gifts.


Victorians adapted the tradition with satin covered cardboard eggs filled with Easter gifts. Why are Easter eggs made of chocolate? Giving chocolate gifts is common at Easter time. The first chocolate eggs appeared in France and Germany in the 19th century but were bitter and hard. As chocolate-making techniques improved, hollow eggs like the ones we have today were developed. They very quickly became popular and remain popular today. What's the Easter Bunny then? The story of the Easter Bunny is thought to have become common in the 19th century. Rabbits usually give birth to a big litter of babies (called kittens), so they became a symbol of new life.


Legend has it that the Easter bunny lays, decorates and hides eggs as they are also a symbol of new life. He doesn't do all the work alone though. In Switzerland, Easter eggs are delivered by a cuckoo, and by a fox in parts of Germany.
Eggs are a forbidden food during Lent, making them a welcome return to the menu on Easter Day. Why do we give eggs at Easter? Easter is a Christian festival. For Christians the custom of giving eggs at Easter celebrates new life. Christians remember that Jesus, after dying on the cross, rose from the dead.


They believe that, through his resurrection, Jesus defeated death and sin and offers people the promise of eternal life if they follow his teachings. What were the first Easter eggs like? The first eggs given at Easter were birds eggs. These eggs were painted in bright colours to give them further meaning as a gift. We still paint bird eggs today but usually only chicken eggs. An Anglo-Saxon legend tells how the Saxon goddess Eostre found a wounded bird and transformed it into a hare, so that it could survive the Winter. The hare found it could lay eggs, so it decorated these each Spring and left them as offering to the goddess.


In the UK, we have many Easter Customs involving eggs: Egg giving (see Easter egg hunts (see What are Pace Eggs? Pace Eggs are hard boiled eggs with patterned shells, they are traditional in northern parts of England at Easter, with local variants in the name, such as Paste Eggs. Where does the name Pace Egg come from? The name is derived from Pesach (Passover). The design The background colour is provided by onion skins with designs created by leaves and flowers placed next to the shell. All kinds of fun are had with the hard-boiled decorated pace eggs. Egg rolling is very popular in England and is an Easter Monday sport.


Hard-boiled eggs are rolled down a hill. Customs differ from place to place. The winner's egg may be the one that rolls the farthest, survives the most rolls, or is rolled between two pegs. Another activity that takes place on Easter Day is the playing of a game with the eggs known as jarping, It's a bit like playing, with players tapping their opponents' eggs until one breaks. The winner goes through to the next round, and so on until there is only one egg left unbroken. copyright of projectbritain. com A good hit by a jarper is called a dunch. The game is popular in County Durham, where it is played on Easter Sunday.